Bestellen Sie Ihre Fahnen / Flaggen im Flaggen-Shop bei fahnenversand.de


Diese Website beschäftigt sich mit der Wissenschaft der Vexillologie (Flaggenkunde).
Alle auf dieser Website dargebotenen Abbildungen dienen ausschließlich der Informationsvermittlung im Sinne der Flaggenkunde.
Der Hoster dieser Seite distanziert sich ausdrücklich von jedweden hierauf u.U. dargestellten Symbolen verfassungsfeindlicher Organisationen.

This is a mirror of a page that is part of © FOTW Flags Of The World website.
Anything above the previous line isnt part of the Flags of the World Website and was added by the hoster of this mirror.

Colors of the Paris National Guard (France) during the French Revolution (1789-1792)

3. Description (2/6)

Last modified: 2018-07-14 by ivan sache
Keywords: paris national guard |
Links: FOTW homepage | search | disclaimer and copyright | write us | mirrors



  • Part 1. Historical background
  • Part 2. Sources describing the colors and analysis

See also:


Saint Nicolas du Chardonnet District (1st Division, 9th Battalion)

[Flag]

Color of the 9th Battalion of the 1st Division - Image by Lazare-Maurice Tisserand, 1875

The district was named for the St. Nicolas du Chardonnet church, built in the 13th century in a place crowded wuth thistles (chardons), the eponymous parish being established in 1243. Rebuilt in the 17th century, the church was rented in 1792 and fully reallocated to the Roman Catholic cult in 1801 by the Concordat.
The parish priest Jospeh-Marie Gros (1742-1792) was elected representative of the Clergy to the Estates-General, where he defended the church; on 19 April 1790, he signed the protest issued by 298 representatives at the Constituent Assembly against the Decree that suppressed the status of State religion previously granted to Catholicism. Gros was killed during the September Massacres.
The district was presided by Henry, chief clark at the Revenue Court and town councillor, member in 1777 of the board of the General Hospital and of the newly founded Mont de Piété (State pawnshop).

Flag quartered red-blue by a white cross. In the middle, a lion holding a spear topped by a Liberty Cap. Above a red / pink scroll with the motto "QUI ME LE RAVIRA" (French: Who Shall Take It From Me).
White sash.
Flag offered by Mr. Armet de Lisle.
The flag was blessed on 2 September 1789 by François-Valentin Mulot, Canon at the St. Victor abbey.
[Vieilh de Varenne's rendition; Margerand's rendition]

Ivan Sache, 24 January 2018


Mathurins District (1st Division, 10th Battalion)

[Flag]

Color of the 10th Battalion of the 1st Division - Image by Lazare-Maurice Tisserand, 1875

The district was named for the St. Mathurin convent, founded un the 13th century by the Trinitarian Order near an old chapel dedicated to St. Mathurin. In the 17th century, the convent was so famous that the order was widely known as Mathurins.
The district was presided by Étienne, quarternier (the quarteniers were borough [quartier] police officers) and King's councillor.

Flag quartered "celeste blue-crimson red" (Sépet) by a white cross. The blue quarters semé with fleurs-de-lis yellow, the red quarters charged with a silver ship. In each arm of the cross, a red and white cross. In the middle of the flag, a silver scroll with the motto "LIBERTE" (French: Liberty).
White sash.
Flag offered by Mr. Dret.
[Vieilh de Varenne's rendition; Margerand's rendition]

Ivan Sache, 24 January 2018


Prémontrés de la Croix Rouge District (2nd Division, 1st Battalion)

[Flag]

Color of the 1st Battalion of the 2nd Division - Image by Lazare-Maurice Tisserand, 1875

The district was named for the Premonstratensian College, built in 1664 at the Red Cross (croix rouge) junction, its cornerstone being put up by Ann of Austria.
The district was presided by Laurent de Mezière, former judge-consul (the judges-consuls were replaced in 1790 by the Commercial Courts).

White flag, in the middle a red cross, outlined in blue, the ends of the arms charged with "P", "M", and "R", in the middle an allegoric figure. At the top of the cross, a crown surrounded by rays and charged with the motto "IMMORTALITE" (French: Immortality). The arms of the cross each ending with a yellow fleur-de-lis. In each corner of the flag, a (Royal) coat of arms.
Blue sash.
Flag offered by Mr. Royer.
Sépet gives the color's size as 7.5 ft.
[Vieilh de Varenne's rendition; Margerand's rendition]

Ivan Sache, 24 January 2018


Barnabites District (2nd Division, 2nd Battalion)

[Flag]

Color of the 2nd Battalion of the 2nd Division - Image by Lazare-Maurice Tisserand, 1875

The district was named for the Barnabite convent and church, built in the Cité Island, facing the Court of Justice. The convent was transformed in 1790 in a workshop where the church's bells and copper churchware were transformed into coins.
The district was presided by Quatremère de l'Épine, Knight of the Order of the King and former municipal councillor.

White flag, in the center a Royal crown topped by a fleur-de-lis, in each corner, a fleur-de-lis. Below the crown, the motto "H IV / CITE" (French: H(enry) IV / City). White-blue-red sash.
Flag offered by Mr. Chéret Jr.
The color was blessed on 6 August 1789.
[Vieilh de Varenne's rendition; Margerand's rendition]

Ivan Sache, 24 January 2018


Cordeliers District (2nd Division, 3rd Battalion)

[Flag]

Color of the 3rd Battalion of the 2nd Division - Image by Lazare-Maurice Tisserand, 1875

The district was named for the Cordeliers (Franciscan) convent and church founded in 1230, suppressed in 1790. The church was demolished but the convent's theology classroom was used as a meeting place by the Société des Amis des Droits de l'Homme, renamed Club des Cordeliers.
Less organized and disciplined than the Jacobins, the Cordeliers welcomed famous orators such as Jean-Paul Marat (1743-1793), Georges Danton (1759-1794) and Camille Desmoulins (1760-1794). The club also incorporated foreign members, such as Anne-Josèphe Théroigne de Méricourt (1762-1817), from Liège, and the Prussian baron Anacharsis Clootz (1755-1794). The Cordeliers redacted the petition asking the overthrow of the king, which they put up on the Homeland's Altar erected on the Champs-de-Mars; the troubles that broke out caused the proclamation of the Martial Law and the National Guard shot on the mob.
Following the exile of the Duke d'Orléans (1747-1793), their main supporter, the Cordeliers declined and eventually merged in 1794 with the Jacobins.

Flag quartered red-white by a blue cross. No motto.
Blue-white sash.
Flag offered by Mr. Crèvecœur.
[Vieilh de Varenne's rendition; Margerand's rendition]

Ivan Sache, 24 January 2018


Notre Dame District (2nd Division, 4th Battalion)

[Flag]

Color of the 4th Battalion of the 2nd Division - Image by Lazare-Maurice Tisserand, 1875

The district was named for the Notre Dame de Paris church, whose building, started in 1333 by Bishop Maurice de Sully, lasted more than 130 years. For centuries, Notre Dame was the place of important religious ceremonies involving the Royal family (marriages, christenings, coronations); in 1781, a Te Deum was performed to celebrate the birth of Louis XVI's son, this being the last significant Royal ceremony that took place in the church before the Revolution. On 5 August 1789, Leclerc de Juigné's Te Deum was performed to celebrate the abolition of the feudal privileges, decided during the night of 4 August.
In 1793, the Municipality of Paris voted the demolition of the church, which was partially achieved; on 10 November 1793, the Convention attended in the church the celebration of the cult of Goddess Reason.
The signature of the Concordate was celebrated in the church on the 28 Germinal of the Year X (18 April 1802), while Emperor Napoléon I and Empress Joséphine were coronated there by Pope Pius VII in 1804.

Flag quartered red-blue by a white cross. In each corner, a yellow fleur-de-lis pointing centerwise. In the center, two cannons crossed per saltire, branches, a sun and a monogram. Above a red and silver scroll with the motto "LE SALUT DE LA PATRIE" (French: The Salute of the Homeland).
White sash. Flag offered by Mr. Lorthion.
[Vieilh de Varenne's rendition; Margerand's rendition]

Sépet gives the color's size as 6 ft and the colors as "light blue" and "pink".
The color was blessed by priest Radix on 17 July 1789, 10 AM, in the choir of the Notre Dame de Paris church church. This was the first color manufactured, blessed and presented to the King.

Ivan Sache, 24 January 2018


Saint Séverin District (2nd Division, 5th Battalion)

[Flag]

Color of the 5th Battalion of the 2nd Division - Image by Lazare-Maurice Tisserand, 1875

The district, presided by de Caux, municipal councillor, was named from the St. Séverin church. One of the oldest in Paris, the church is named for an hermit who lived there in an oratory in the 6th century. The church was built in the 13th-15th centuries.

Flag quartered red-blue by a white cross. In each corner, a yellow fleur-de-lis pointing centerwise. In the center, fasces surrounded by a branch and a palm. Above a silver scroll with the motto UNION FAIT NOTRE FORCE" (French: Unity Makes Our Strength).
White sash.
Flag offered by the citizens of the district.
[Vieilh de Varenne's rendition; Margerand's rendition]

Ivan Sache, 24 January 2018


Petits Augustins de la Reine Marguerite District (2nd Division, 6th Battalion)

[Flag]

Color of the 6th Battalion of the 2nd Division - Image by Lazare-Maurice Tisserand, 1875

The district was named for the Augustinian convent founded in 1606 by Marguerite de Valois. During the Revolution, the convent was transformed into the Unity Hospital, subsequently renamed as the Charity Hospital, eventually demolished in 1935.

White flag. In each corner, a yellow fleur-de-lis pointing centerwise. In the center, a blue coat of arms showing fasces surrounded by three yellow fleurs-de-lis, surrounded by branches. Above a silver scroll with the motto "UNION ET LIBERTE" (French: Unity and Liberty). Below a red scroll with the writing "BATAILLON DES PETITS AUGUSTINS", below a "S L" monogram.
White sash.
Flag offered by Mr. Chapelas.
[Vieilh de Varenne's rendition; Margerand's rendition]

Ivan Sache, 24 January 2018


Abbaye de Saint Germain des Prés District (2nd Division, 7th Battalion)

[Flag]

Color of the 7th Battalion of the 2nd Division - Image by Lazare-Maurice Tisserand, 1875

The district, presided by Hubert, police officer (quartenier), was named for the St. Germain des Prés abbey, one of the oldest abbeys in France. The abbey was transformed in 1790 into a power magazine, which blew up on 19-20 August 1794, burning down the abbey's library.

Flag quartered blue-red by a white cross. In each corner, a yellow fleur-de-lis pointing centerwise. Branches in the left and right parts of the crosses. The vertical arms of the cross inscribed "PATRIE & LIBERTE" (French: Homeland & Liberty), written vertically from top to bottom.
Blue-red sash.
[Vieilh de Varenne's rendition; Margerand's rendition]

Ivan Sache, 24 January 2018


Jacobins de la Rue Saint Dominique District (2nd Division, 8th Battalion)

[Flag]

Color of the 8th Battalion of the 2nd Division - Image by Lazare-Maurice Tisserand, 1875

The district, aka Jacobins du Faubourg Saint Germain according to Tisserand, was named for one of the three Jacobin (Dominican) convents established in Paris. The Order of St. Dominic, known in Paris a Jacobins, founded in 1631 a noviciate in the street that would be later named St. Dominic Street. The Club des Jacobins, after having been expelled from the Jacobine Convent of St. Honoré Street, moved to the St. Thomas of Aquino church, which was the former chapel of the Jacobine noviciate. A mass was celebrated by Pope Pius VII in the church on 26 December 1804.

White flag. In the lower corners, a yellow fleur-de-lis pointing centerwise. In the center an oval shield surrounded by branches. Above a silver scroll with the writing "DISTRICT DES JACOBINS FSG".
White sash.
[Vieilh de Varenne's rendition; Margerand's rendition]

Ivan Sache, 24 January 2018


Théatins District (2nd Division, 9th Battalion)

[Flag]

Color of the 9th Battalion of the 2nd Division - Image by Lazare-Maurice Tisserand, 1875

The district was named for the convent established by Mazarin in 1648 for the Theatines, an order founded in Chieti (Italy) in 1525. Mazarin's heart was kept in the convent's chapel. This was the only Theatine convent in France. Sold during the Revolution, the convent was transformed into a concert hall and eventually demolished in 1821.

Flag quartered blue-red by a white saltire. In the middle a red disk surrounded by yellow spears and charged with a silver ship surmounted by fasces topped with a Liberty Cap and a crown. In the blue left quarter, a medallion inscribed "II Div. / IX. B". In the lower red quarter, three disks, the outer ones charged with "14" and "1789", the central one charged with a lion (probably symbolizing July). At the top a silver scroll inscribed "DISTRICT DES THÉATINS".
White sash.
Flag offered by the (unreadable) of the district.
[Vieilh de Varenne's rendition; Margerand's rendition]

E. Liris states that the color features 60 spears grouped in the center of the ship representing the Commune of Paris. The mainmast is decorated with a fasces of arms surrounded by an oak garland, surmounted by a liberty cap. The identification of the Commune with the 60 districts is increased by the letter "B", standing for Bailly (1736-1793), who was appointed Mayor of Paris on 16 July 1789 and, was, at the time, as popular as La Fayette.

Ivan Sache, 24 January 2018


Carmes Déchaussés District (2nd Division, 10th Battalion)

[Flag]

Color of the 10th Battalion of the 2nd Division - Image by Lazare-Maurice Tisserand, 1875

The district was named for the convent built by the Discalced Carmelites in 1318. Closed in 1790, it was transformed into an ammunition factory and eventually demolished in 1814. The convent's church was used in 1791 to jail refractory priests; on 2 September 1792, a band of extremists led by Maillard slaughtered 200 prisoners in the convent's building and gardens.

"Very dark King blue" (Sépet) flag semé with yellow fleurs-de-lis. A white square diamond touching the edges of the flag, bordered yellow and with red triangles, charged with a women's allegoric figure (France) holding a spear topped by a Liberty Cap.
White sash.
Flag offered by Monsieur, the King's brother.
[Vieilh de Varenne's rendition; Margerand's rendition]

E. Liris explains that the flag, designed by Boisseau, the king's sculptor and a member of the Royal Academy, features an allegoric representation of Paris rather than France. The Town of Paris sits in the center of the scene, at the ship's prow, crowned, holding in her right hand a pike surmounted by a red Liberty Cap outlined in green and in her left hand a civic crown she puts on the shield of France and Mount Carmel. The writing says that the Paris people arrived "at good harbor", beneath appear the date "14 July 1789" and the word "Liberty". On the right is discretely shown the siege of the Bastile; on the left, a fasces of arms symbolize the 60 districts, surrounded by the Latin writing "juncti roborantur" (Union Makes Strength).

Ivan Sache, 24 January 2018


 
Anything below the following line isnt part of the Flags of the World Website and was added by the hoster of this mirror.

Bei fahnenversand.de erhalten Sie eine Vielzahl an günstigen Flaggen, Pins und Aufnähern, zum Beispiel:
Flagge der Königlichen Familie von Großbritannien
 (150 x 90 cm) Flagge Flaggen Fahne Fahnen kaufen bestellen Shop Flaggen-Pin Italien Flagge Flaggen Fahne Fahnen kaufen bestellen Shop Fahne von Berlin Tempelhof-Schöneberg
 (150 x 90 cm) Flagge Flaggen Fahne Fahnen kaufen bestellen Shop Fahne Iran
 (250 x 150 cm) Flagge Flaggen Fahne Fahnen kaufen bestellen Shop Autoflagge Russland mit Adler Flagge Flaggen Fahne Fahnen kaufen bestellen Shop